Authors Posts by Digby Fullam

Digby Fullam

87 POSTS 98 COMMENTS
Digby Fullam is a photographer with a passion for photojournalism and narrative documentary photography. He finds street photography to be an excellent storytelling medium. He is the newest addition of the Streethunters.net team. If you would like to see his work you can also visit his Street Hunters Profile.

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Sachin Khona interview cover

Streethunters.net provides a great platform for showcasing the work of many street photographers from all around the world, be they famous and well known masters,  up-and-coming photographers, or even lesser known lights who have flown under the radar. Through sharing their work online in our Facebook group on Flickr, and by participating in our monthly themed street photography contests, photographers have a great opportunity to get their work out there and give us as editors and you our readers and fellow street photographers the fabulous experience of being able to enjoy great street photos every single day. But even with all these ways of sharing your work with us, there’s still a lot of great street photography work that we don’t get to see, which is why we always welcome you guys dropping us an email from time to time, letting us know what you’re up to, and showing us some of your street photos. And that’s exactly what Sachin Khona, a Vancouver based wedding photographer and member of street photography collective The 8 Street, did, when he asked us to take a look at the street photos he’d produced after his month in India. We really enjoyed looking through Sachin’s India street photos, and we figured that many of you would too, so we asked Sachin if he’d like to take part in an interview to discuss his street photography, and much to our delight, he said yes! So get ready to dive into Sachin Khona’s exclusive interview with Streethunters.net…

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10 reasons I use manual in street photography cover

As tech progresses further and further we find more and more that we need to do less and less to make things happen. Cars can now swap cogs, brake automatically, and in some respects drive far better than people can manage. Homes are becoming ‘smart’, with auto lights and heating, and Wi-Fi enabled everything. The great march towards automation is the Holy Grail for manufacturers, and will in all likelihood come to define and dramatically shape how we live our lives this century. Naturally of course, the drive of automation has been embraced by camera manufacturers too over the last half century or so, with the arrival of built-in light meters, auto winders, automatic exposure modes, motor drive, autofocus and TTL flash – the list goes on and on. And all this is hardly surprising. There’s a lot to think about in photography, and auto modes take so much of the hassle out of the process, paring it back for the majority of users so all they need to worry about is pressing the shutter. As well as their portability and always-with-you convenience, a big aspect of the success of smartphones and iPhones as cameras is the effectiveness of their fully auto camera controls. With each new phone or software update the technology gets better and better, with the phone doing more and more of the work to easily produce great looking pictures exactly how the user envisaged. Hell, the newest iPhone can now even make ‘professional’ style shallow depth of field portrait photos! But there remains something brilliantly satisfying about using manual controls in photography, in much the same way as it’s great fun to drive a fully manual sports car. And in street photography in particular, I personally feel that shooting fully manual is the best way for me to get the results I want, and get maximum enjoyment from the experience. Why? Well, let me first explain exactly what I mean by ‘fully manual” and then give you my personal run-down of the 10 reasons why I shoot in manual mode for street photography.

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What I learned from Film Street Photography cover

ATTENTION

The following views do not necessarily represent the views of the whole StreetHunters team.


Still, in 2017 the debate between digital and film rages on. Digital may have won the technological and consumer battle, but the struggle for hearts and minds continues ad infinitum. There continue to be countless street photographers who love shooting with film and maintain that it is the best way to go. Film still offers one of the best bang-for-your-buck initial investments into the world of cameras and particularly street photography (though more on that later), and is a fully traditional process practiced by the great masters of street photography, and a medium that has been refined through years and years of gentle evolution. It is grown-up, mature, tried and tested. Digital, by contrast (and in the grand scheme of things) is still in its infancy. While it has overtaken film in several technical aspects – light sensitivity (ISO) and size (ie the ability to squeeze sensors and cameras into our smartphones) being just two examples – in other respects digital continues to evolve and require finessing. The digital street photographer is still playing and experimenting with a medium in flux, and one where they still (if successfully lured into it) have to take part in the constant arms race and never ending hamster wheel of new gear (read sensors) through gear acquisition syndrome. It’s not necessary, but it’s an easy trap to fall into. No such issues with film. And then there’s that intangible quality. The utterly subjective (and to an extent invented) and the mythical. The glorious analogue nature of a process that as times seems like witchcraft made real. Light and chemistry coming together to create something not alive, but packed full of character and imperfection. Where silicon wafers and ones and zeros are replaced with something altogether more powerful. Something with soul. Or so it goes. As a millennial, raised on 35mm disposal and compact cameras in the ‘90s but cutting my teeth and really ‘learning’ solely on digital in the noughties, I owed it to myself to give film a shot. So read on for my experience of using film in street photography.

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Street Photography Image Problem Cover

ATTENTION

The following views do not necessarily represent the views of the whole StreetHunters team.


As I fire off another frame because I’m out ‘shooting on the streets’ and I feel compelled to, I often wonder just what the point of it all is. The same feeling often pervades me as I browse through my Lightroom catalogue. Hundreds and thousands of street photos but just what am I striving for? When I get into this kind of mindset I often begin to think about the concept of street photography as a whole, and the more I do, the more I begin to wonder about the genre itself, whether there are some real issues that need addressing, and specifically, does street photography have an image problem?

I edited this blog post on 6/5/2017 to include a reference to an article by Michael Sweet which I had forgotten about – thank you to Karen Commings for the reminder!

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Tarik Ahmet Streethunters.net interview cover

We’re in a privileged position here at Streethunters.net in that we’re lucky enough to see a lot of different street photos from loads of photographers all the time. Just a quick browse through our Flickr or Facebook group gives you an example of the great work we get to enjoy on a daily basis. But what really gets our creative juices flowing is when we see a street photographer who not only pushes themselves out of their comfort zone, but also goes a step further and creates a set of photos that combine together to form something cohesive and powerful. We’re talking of course about street photographers creating projects. The particular project that caught our interest in this instance came from Tarik Ahmet, who dropped us an email to tell us about his experience on an epic 24 hour street hunt on the London Underground. Intrigued? You bet we were! Read on for our Streethunters.net interview with Tarik discussing the finer points of his crazy project.

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Inside Digby Fullam’s Camera bag

ATTENTION – Send us your camera bags!

If you want to participate, please read the rules of participation at the end of the post.
Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!


Inside Digby Fullam’s Camera bag! (Bag No120)

Hi Street Hunters!

You may well remember back almost 2 years ago when I first shared the contents of my camera bag with you all. Quite a lot has changed since then, as I’ve moved away from using a full frame Canon 6D DSLR for street photography to a mirrorless camera, which has meant that my setup has gotten a lot smaller in the process. As we’ve had a little lull in our camera bag submissions of late, I thought I’d take the opportunity to share one of my updated camera bag setups with you all, in the hope that some of you who have already sent in your camera bags might resubmit if your camera gear setup has changed like mine has! This particular photo of my gear shows what I’d call my ultra-portable Street Hunt bag setup, and it’s a collection of all the equipment (including an action cam) that I need for shooting one of the street hunt videos you see on our YouTube channel. It can take hours and hours (and lots of miles of walking) to record a street hunt video, so I adhere to a strictly minimalist and ‘essentials’-only mantra to fit everything I need for a photo walk inside my Street Hunters Cosyspeed Camslinger Streetomatic camera bag. This light portability is huge departure for me from my previous massive Lowepro Messenger bag that held a DSLR rig and several lenses, but my newer lightweight bag setup includes everything I really need for a good street hunt, including my flash and triggers for off-camera flash street photography!

My Street Hunters Cosyspeed Camslinger Streetomatic contains:

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Hip & LCD Shooting for Street Photography Cover

It’s a slightly controversial approach, and one that will have some purists up in arms, but I think hip shooting has an important role to play in street photography when deployed as part of your wider street photography shooting technique arsenal. With that mind, I thought I’d put together a short little of my top tips for the best results using the hip shot technique for street photography, plus an extra tidbit of advice that will come in handy for hip-level LCD shooting too. So dive into our guide to hip shooting in street photography and head on out to the streets! And if you want to see some examples of the hip shot street photography technique in action, don’t forget to check out a video of Spyros Papaspyropoulos on the streets of Rethymno, Crete in our Street Talk Episode 6 – The Hip Shot Technique in Street Photography.

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Crit My Pic Wilson Square by Nathanael Fournier

For our crit my pic feature this week we’re going to be looking at an analogue film street photo that was shot by Nathanaël Fournier. The photo is titled ‘Wilson Square’ and is part of his “Everyday’s Life Value” series. As usual for this feature, I’ll be analysing this photo across the criteria of point of view, focal point, composition, exposure, subject matter, and mood. I still have quite a backlog of photos to be working through, so, I’m going to ask that you don’t send in any new photos for the time being until I’ve had a chance to catch up a little. That concludes our introduction, so now we can get into the really meaty stuff – the crit of ‘Wilson Square’ by Nathanaël Fournier!

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Ultimate Street Photography Hacks Cover

In our combined years of experience out shooting on the streets, the Streethunters.net team have picked up a thing or two. The more you practice your street photography, the more little tips and tricks you learn along the way. Things that might not seem obvious at first (or inversely, are blindingly obvious when you think about it), but that actually make a real improvement to your street photography experience. We’ve pooled our knowledge together to come up with a list for you, so strap yourselves in for the Street Hunters Ultimate Street Photography Hacks!

**Update!: This list has been updated with a couple of new hacks inspired by your suggestions, thank you!!**

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Crit My Pic 'Boardwalk Biker' by Michael Schmitt

After an unexpected break, Crit My Pic has returned! The street photo we are going to be analysing this week has been submitted by Michael Schmitt and it is titled ‘Boardwalk Biker’. If you need reminding of the criteria we use to analyse each photo, they are point of view, focal point, composition, exposure, subject matter, and mood. As we have a large collection of photos to analyse, for the time being at least we won’t ask you to send us in any more photos for Crit My Pic. Now it’s time to get into the analysis of the ‘Boardwalk Biker’ by Michael Schmitt.