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Zlatko Vickovic Eyes Without the Face
'Eyes Without the Face' by Zlatko Vickovic

Introduction

Month after month, we here at Street Hunters have been wonderfully overwhelmed with a flood of great submissions for our Monthly Theme Contests! The contests from the first quarter of 2017 have yielded four truly outstanding winning shots from Roy Rozanski, Kristof Vande Velde, Christoph Wuzella and Sreejith Kaviyil. Four months. Four winners. Four great shooters from four different places on the globe. So what would May bring? Would we be showered yet again with great work?

May begins a five-month stretch where the Monthly Theme Contests will be focused on colors. From May through September, each month’s theme will be one specific color. It may seem simple enough, but the challenge itself raises the bar. The photo really has to stand out within the constraints of the color theme. A photo with just that color element would not be enough.

May’s theme was the color green, and, appropriately enough, we were presented with a bumper crop of green goodness! There was a multitude of shots with clever use of the color, popping off the screen and grabbing our attention. But one shot was more than just a poppin’ o’ the green. More than clever. Ladies and gentlemen, Zlatko Vickovic won this month with an explosion of green!

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Sachin Khona interview cover

Streethunters.net provides a great platform for showcasing the work of many street photographers from all around the world, be they famous and well known masters,  up-and-coming photographers, or even lesser known lights who have flown under the radar. Through sharing their work online in our Facebook group on Flickr, and by participating in our monthly themed street photography contests, photographers have a great opportunity to get their work out there and give us as editors and you our readers and fellow street photographers the fabulous experience of being able to enjoy great street photos every single day. But even with all these ways of sharing your work with us, there’s still a lot of great street photography work that we don’t get to see, which is why we always welcome you guys dropping us an email from time to time, letting us know what you’re up to, and showing us some of your street photos. And that’s exactly what Sachin Khona, a Vancouver based wedding photographer and member of street photography collective The 8 Street, did, when he asked us to take a look at the street photos he’d produced after his month in India. We really enjoyed looking through Sachin’s India street photos, and we figured that many of you would too, so we asked Sachin if he’d like to take part in an interview to discuss his street photography, and much to our delight, he said yes! So get ready to dive into Sachin Khona’s exclusive interview with Streethunters.net…

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Women Street Photographers. Photo by Kristin Van den Eede

Introduction

Dear Streethunters.net Readers,

3 years ago, we wrote a blog post called 25 Inspirational Ladies of Street Photography. A lot has changed in the street photography scene since then, so we feel it’s time for a new, updated, larger list dedicated to women street photographers.

In an attempt to promote more active women street photographers, (i.e. photographers who actually take street photos during the time of writing) Streethunters.net explored the web in search of ladies who like shooting in the streets and share some, most, or all of their street photos online. Not all of them are strictly street photographers. Some of them shoot street on their spare time, others even less than that, but all of them have photos worth sharing and that is why they ended up on this list.

Before we present you with a roll call of these ladies, we kindly ask you to send in any names of female street photographers you know and would like to see in this list. But that is enough for an introduction, let’s go and meet the women street photographers you should follow on the web.

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Sreejith Kaviyil interview cover

Introduction

The winning shots for The Street Hunters Monthly Theme Contests have been outstanding! Each month, each theme, has brought us a slew of great submissions and choosing finalists has become a most  delightfully arduous task. Christoph Wuzella knocked us out in March with his Flash theme submission. Kristof Vande Velde took us into the Surreal with his otherworldly February submission. And Roy Rozanski crossed us up properly with his Zebra Crossings submission for January. So, what would April bring?

The theme for April was Juxtaposition, and again we were showered with some killer submissions! Juxtaposition, as defined by Merriam Webster, is “the act or an instance of placing two or more things side by side often to compare or contrast or to create an interesting effect.” The clever capture/use of juxtaposition can truly make a street photograph. That being said, there was cleverness abound within April’s submissions. However, there was one shot that brought it home with *multiple* juxtapositions! The one who prepared the buffet of juxtaposition? That would be Sreejith Kaviyil!

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10 reasons I use manual in street photography cover

As tech progresses further and further we find more and more that we need to do less and less to make things happen. Cars can now swap cogs, brake automatically, and in some respects drive far better than people can manage. Homes are becoming ‘smart’, with auto lights and heating, and Wi-Fi enabled everything. The great march towards automation is the Holy Grail for manufacturers, and will in all likelihood come to define and dramatically shape how we live our lives this century. Naturally of course, the drive of automation has been embraced by camera manufacturers too over the last half century or so, with the arrival of built-in light meters, auto winders, automatic exposure modes, motor drive, autofocus and TTL flash – the list goes on and on. And all this is hardly surprising. There’s a lot to think about in photography, and auto modes take so much of the hassle out of the process, paring it back for the majority of users so all they need to worry about is pressing the shutter. As well as their portability and always-with-you convenience, a big aspect of the success of smartphones and iPhones as cameras is the effectiveness of their fully auto camera controls. With each new phone or software update the technology gets better and better, with the phone doing more and more of the work to easily produce great looking pictures exactly how the user envisaged. Hell, the newest iPhone can now even make ‘professional’ style shallow depth of field portrait photos! But there remains something brilliantly satisfying about using manual controls in photography, in much the same way as it’s great fun to drive a fully manual sports car. And in street photography in particular, I personally feel that shooting fully manual is the best way for me to get the results I want, and get maximum enjoyment from the experience. Why? Well, let me first explain exactly what I mean by ‘fully manual” and then give you my personal run-down of the 10 reasons why I shoot in manual mode for street photography.

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Introduction

Not so long ago Street Photography wasn’t as known as it is today. I remember when I used to tell my friends back in 2012 that my hobby is shooting street, they had no idea what I was talking about! And, when I explained, they thought it was weird and pervy. But things have changed since then. Things have changed a lot.

Thanks to the passion of a few individuals such as Eric Kim, Blake Andrews and Yanidel to name a few that constantly kept sharing their ideas and experiences about Street Photography through their blogs, the genre has now reached a new level of recognition.

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Alex Webb's 'La Calle'

Mexico. As a citizen of the United States, the country has become more than just our southern neighbor. It has become a hot-button issue. The country itself seems to be a point of contention. Immigration, “The Wall”, trade, crime, drugs. These topics all flashpoints for argument and also fuel that helped to put the Trump administration into the White House. Debates on issues involving Mexico are not likely to end soon, either. No matter how one stands on such issues, one thing is certain… most of the news reported to us here in the U.S. about Mexico is negative.

That being said, Mexico has been on my mind. I’ve never been there, but it has always fascinated me. I know depictions in movies and television are not the most accurate and news bits only give a taste, a sampling of more negativity. I wanted to see the beauty that I knew had to be there. I’ve seen fragments of it. And these fragments often fueled vivid, imagined scenes, often paired with the mandatory and ubiquitous classical guitar. I wanted to see photographs and I wanted a book of them. I wanted to be able to linger on the images and savor them. Fortunately, there were two fresh options from two photographers whose work I truly admire. There was Alex Webb’s ‘La Calle’ and ‘Mexico: Photographs’ by Mark Cohen. Due to budget constraints, I could choose only one. I ultimately chose Webb’s offering only because of the fact that I didn’t own anything by him. I knew he had worked in Mexico a good deal, and samples of his work from there were gorgeous. There likely wasn’t a bad decision to be made, but I must admit that I’m very pleased with my choice.

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What I learned from Film Street Photography cover

ATTENTION

The following views do not necessarily represent the views of the whole StreetHunters team.


Still, in 2017 the debate between digital and film rages on. Digital may have won the technological and consumer battle, but the struggle for hearts and minds continues ad infinitum. There continue to be countless street photographers who love shooting with film and maintain that it is the best way to go. Film still offers one of the best bang-for-your-buck initial investments into the world of cameras and particularly street photography (though more on that later), and is a fully traditional process practiced by the great masters of street photography, and a medium that has been refined through years and years of gentle evolution. It is grown-up, mature, tried and tested. Digital, by contrast (and in the grand scheme of things) is still in its infancy. While it has overtaken film in several technical aspects – light sensitivity (ISO) and size (ie the ability to squeeze sensors and cameras into our smartphones) being just two examples – in other respects digital continues to evolve and require finessing. The digital street photographer is still playing and experimenting with a medium in flux, and one where they still (if successfully lured into it) have to take part in the constant arms race and never ending hamster wheel of new gear (read sensors) through gear acquisition syndrome. It’s not necessary, but it’s an easy trap to fall into. No such issues with film. And then there’s that intangible quality. The utterly subjective (and to an extent invented) and the mythical. The glorious analogue nature of a process that as times seems like witchcraft made real. Light and chemistry coming together to create something not alive, but packed full of character and imperfection. Where silicon wafers and ones and zeros are replaced with something altogether more powerful. Something with soul. Or so it goes. As a millennial, raised on 35mm disposal and compact cameras in the ‘90s but cutting my teeth and really ‘learning’ solely on digital in the noughties, I owed it to myself to give film a shot. So read on for my experience of using film in street photography.

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Street Hunt 23 in Athens, Greece

Introduction

Dear  Streethunters.net Readers hello!

It has been a while since the previous Street Hunt. Due to the fact that Street Hunt videos require some time to be shot, edited and prepared for post, we are not posting as many as we used to, so we are sorry for that. However, we are trying to keep our YouTube channel active with our new series called Street Talk. If you haven’t read or heard about Street Talk yet, you can always jump to the Street Talk introductory blog post or visit the Street Talk YouTube Playlist that is part of the Street Hunters YouTube channel.

Today I am happy to present to you with our latest Street Hunt video, Street Hunt #23 that we shot in Athens, Greece.

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Christoph Wuzella interview cover

Introduction

The Street Hunters Monthly Theme Contests for 2017 are off to a fantastic start! January and the Zebra Crossings theme featured Roy Rozanski’s superbly timed shot. February’s challenging Surrealism theme was seized by Kristof Vande Velde and his otherworldy blue-flame-head photo. March threw down the gauntlet with a theme challenge that is near and dear to us at Street Hunters HQ… Flash Street Photography!

Yet again, we were flush with quality entries and choosing a winner was no easy task, even when we narrowed the finalists down to three. Flash is becoming more and more popular in street, you can see posts featuring it appearing more frequently on social media feeds and online galleries and portfolios. And Flash Street Photography has been covered quite often here at www.streethunters.net. We wanted to see a great street photo that was blasted with light and punched us right in the eyes. We got punched, alright, and it was Christoph Wuzella who delivered the knockout blow!