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I the Sniper by Brian Bjeldbak 01

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Brian von Bjeldbak exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


I, the Sniper

Please accept my excuses up-front for any silly sounding phrases. English is not my native tongue but I can assure you that you’ll have a much better time reading the article in my way of English rather than in Danish.

My old approach to street photography

On a cold day in November some years ago, I was fed up with street photography. After having ploughed my way through the streets of a larger city where nothing of interest had happened before me for the last four hours, I started wondering how to achieve great street photography images.

In my part of the world, Scandinavia, the weather is pretty sour most of the year. People don’t hang out outside so there’s no street life to rely on. So I had to find another approach to this stuff.

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Richard Bram - street photography interview

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


iN-PUBLiC member Richard Bram speaks to StreetHunters about the importance of gesture in street photography.

Winter Landscapes

A view of the London river emerges from the dull cloud of a December morning. Richard gestures out along the estuary, pointing toward the distant buildings of an occasional project.

When asked about the secret to his own street photography, he points to another artist: one to whom winter landscapes were also dear, one to whom a stoop of the leg or a wave of the hand was as important as a shaft of sunlight or a pop of vibrant colour.

But Richard doesn’t point to a photographer. He doesn’t point to the latest Magnum nominee or to the old masters of street photography.

“Hunters in the Snow,” Pieter Brueghel the Elder
“Hunters in the Snow,” Pieter Brueghel the Elder

Instead, he points to an old master of the painterly kind, a Flemish painter from the city of Antwerp working back in the 1500s.

That artist was Pieter Brueghel.

Of Brueghel, Richard says:

‘You know, you have to study the history of art. One of my favourite painters of all time is Breughel. A lot of his best paintings, like “The Road to Calvary” or “The Fall of Icarus” or some of his winter scenes, are filled with people.’

From the hunters bent forward, leaning out of the foreground, to the flattened peasant stretched across the ice in the mid-ground, his work is filled with actions, bodies, gestures.

“Road to Calvary”, Pieter Brueghel the Elder
“Road to Calvary”, Pieter Brueghel the Elder

For Richard then, the key problem in photography becomes not one concerning hard light or soft light, monochrome or colour, Canon or Fuji, but rather:

‘How much action can you put on one canvas before it falls apart? There are hundreds of things going on in some of Brueghel’s paintings – and yet they’re all gorgeous.’

To understand this problem further, we have to go back to the career of a failing businessman; one just starting his hand at photography in the mid-1980s, hoping for a change of luck.

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Street Hunters 2019 - There is nothing permanent except change

Introduction

Dear Readers,

If you are a regular on this website, you might have noticed that it has been a while since I have personally reached out to you with a blog post. Since the beginning of the new year, I have only published a few Camera bags, that you have so generously shared with us and some Throwback Tuesday posts. The last few months have been very busy for me. I have had my hands full at work and at the same time my personal life became more demanding. As a result, I had to sacrifice time from Streethunters.net. Fortunately things are now back to normal, and I am once again ready to pour my energy and my passion into Street Photography.

The purpose of today’s post

The purpose of today’s post is to make an important announcement and to share with you what to expect from the Streethunters.net website and its Social Media channels in 2019.

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New York street photography, photo by James Maher, posted with his permission

New York City is one of the most photographed cities in the world. For good reason, too. It is one of the most interesting places in the world to photograph. From iconic landmarks to gritty street scenes, New York City has it all. You can even photograph nature and wildlife in the numerous beautiful parks if that is something you like. On a street photography level, you could say that New York City offers a one of a kind street photography experience, making it something of a genre all of its own.

Also referred to as NY NY or simply New York, the city has photo opportunities everywhere. Iconic landmarks such as the Brooklyn Bridge, Chrysler Building, or Times Square make for wonderful backdrops in your New York street photography images. To capture an image that stands out, changing one’s perspective or point of view can be helpful. On the other hand instead of focusing on the overall scene, you might want to key in on a detail of a landmark and use it creatively in your composition.

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Dmitry Stepanenko

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


‘A Window Covered with Raindrops’

Saul Leiter once said of his photography:

‘A window covered with raindrops interests me more than a photograph of a famous person.’

Dmitry Stepanenko

This fascination with windows – and by extension – reflections, is widely recognised as a hallmark of his work. Whether bending light or breaking it, reflections allowed Leiter to re-imagine his native New York as an abstract painting, conjuring up an artist’s vision of colour and shape.

Although he passed away in 2013, many present-day street photographers have followed his lead, using reflections to develop their own sense of the surreal. One contemporary inspired by Leiter’s work is Dmitry Stepanenko, a leading London street photographer, organiser of the London Street Photography Festival and Judge of the Miami Street Photography festival.

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Hyperion Camera Straps - Black with Black on X-Pro1
Photo by official Hyperion Camera Straps website - Black with Black on X-Pro1

Introduction

Every street photographer devotes time and attention to choosing the perfect camera for street photography. Choosing the right kit is an essential part of the enjoyment of street photography. If one makes the wrong choice, it will most probably ruin the overall experience for him/her. However there are other things a street photographer should invest some research time into. Such as camera accessories.

Accessories play an important part in one’s comfort. So today, I am going to review one of those accessories, the camera strap. In my opinion, the most important thing in a street photographer’s arsenal after the camera (and lens). It plays a very important role in the overall experience and especially during long street photography sessions that last well over 4-5 hours. At least that is how I feel.

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Photos by London based Street Photographer Becky Frances

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


‘Like Chaplin Does’

Silhouettes, shadows and solitary figures traipsing through winter rain have long been staples of street photography.

But they’re not everyone’s cup of tea.

Street Photographers as diverse as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliot Erwitt and Tavepong Pratoomwong have long championed the ‘brighter side’ to life, incorporating humour, comedy and a sense of the absurd into their work.

Erwitt in particular held humour in high regard, claiming:

“Making people laugh is one of the highest achievements you can have. And when you can make them laugh and cry, alternately, like Chaplin does, now that’s the highest of all possible achievements. I don’t know that I aim for it, but I recognize it as the supreme goal.”

But this goal of making people laugh ‘Like Chaplin does’ is harder than it appears.

Many of us struggle to express humour through our photography, resorting instead to the tried and tested trends of existential despair and postmodern misery.

With such cheery thoughts in mind, Street Hunters turned to one of London’s leading street photographers – Becky Frances – for some helpful tips and advice.

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Behind bars by Rupert Vandervell

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


Shapes and Forms

‘I’m not necessarily interested in the main subject at all … all they’re doing is adding another shape or form.’

What Rupert describes as shapes and forms are in fact two builders fetching their tools from a van outside the cafe.

‘I’m more interested in the light coming through that bench in the street and the shadows it creates.’

By the end of the interview, Rupert’s not only reduced the builders to their shadows and the bench to its highlights. He’s reduced the entire daylight shooting hours from 9 to 11. And for that matter, he’s reduced the entire calendar year from mid-April through to late June. As if by summary, he raises his hand and exclaims:

‘If the light’s bad, I’ll go home.’

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The Fujifilm X100F for Street Photography

Introduction

It had been a while since our friends from Fujifilm Hellas had send us a camera for a review. But the wait has definitely been worth it as recently I received the amazing little Fujifilm X100F to try out and review. Fujifilm let me keep the camera for 3 whole weeks and I also got to take it with me to Berlin for 4 days! When in Berlin, I didn’t take any other camera with me, on purpose, in order to really get to know this little gem. To find out more about what I think of the Fujifilm X100F for Street Photography, just read on!

Before we jump into the review though, I would like to remind you of our previous camera reviews that you might find interesting. We have written reviews on the, Fujifilm X-Pro2, the Fujifilm X-Pro1, the Ricoh GR, the Fujifilm X-T10, the Fujifilm X-T1, the Fujifilm X70 and the Canon EOS 6D.

As I have mentioned before in the past, all the cameras we review here on Streethunters.net are reviewed in a particular way and under specific circumstances. They are reviewed as street photography cameras specifically. We do not care less about pixel peeping, lens distortions, chromatic aberrations or anything like that. What matters as far as we are concerned is how the camera handles in the streets!

Now that this intro is over, let us look into the Fujifilm X100F for Street Photography!