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Hyperion Camera Straps - Black with Black on X-Pro1
Photo by official Hyperion Camera Straps website - Black with Black on X-Pro1

Introduction

Every street photographer devotes time and attention to choosing the perfect camera for street photography. Choosing the right kit is an essential part of the enjoyment of street photography. If one makes the wrong choice, it will most probably ruin the overall experience for him/her. However there are other things a street photographer should invest some research time into. Such as camera accessories.

Accessories play an important part in one’s comfort. So today, I am going to review one of those accessories, the camera strap. In my opinion, the most important thing in a street photographer’s arsenal after the camera (and lens). It plays a very important role in the overall experience and especially during long street photography sessions that last well over 4-5 hours. At least that is how I feel.

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Photos by London based Street Photographer Becky Frances

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


‘Like Chaplin Does’

Silhouettes, shadows and solitary figures traipsing through winter rain have long been staples of street photography.

But they’re not everyone’s cup of tea.

Street Photographers as diverse as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliot Erwitt and Tavepong Pratoomwong have long championed the ‘brighter side’ to life, incorporating humour, comedy and a sense of the absurd into their work.

Erwitt in particular held humour in high regard, claiming:

“Making people laugh is one of the highest achievements you can have. And when you can make them laugh and cry, alternately, like Chaplin does, now that’s the highest of all possible achievements. I don’t know that I aim for it, but I recognize it as the supreme goal.”

But this goal of making people laugh ‘Like Chaplin does’ is harder than it appears.

Many of us struggle to express humour through our photography, resorting instead to the tried and tested trends of existential despair and postmodern misery.

With such cheery thoughts in mind, Street Hunters turned to one of London’s leading street photographers – Becky Frances – for some helpful tips and advice.

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Behind bars by Rupert Vandervell

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


Shapes and Forms

‘I’m not necessarily interested in the main subject at all … all they’re doing is adding another shape or form.’

What Rupert describes as shapes and forms are in fact two builders fetching their tools from a van outside the cafe.

‘I’m more interested in the light coming through that bench in the street and the shadows it creates.’

By the end of the interview, Rupert’s not only reduced the builders to their shadows and the bench to its highlights. He’s reduced the entire daylight shooting hours from 9 to 11. And for that matter, he’s reduced the entire calendar year from mid-April through to late June. As if by summary, he raises his hand and exclaims:

‘If the light’s bad, I’ll go home.’

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The Fujifilm X100F for Street Photography

Introduction

It had been a while since our friends from Fujifilm Hellas had send us a camera for a review. But the wait has definitely been worth it as recently I received the amazing little Fujifilm X100F to try out and review. Fujifilm let me keep the camera for 3 whole weeks and I also got to take it with me to Berlin for 4 days! When in Berlin, I didn’t take any other camera with me, on purpose, in order to really get to know this little gem. To find out more about what I think of the Fujifilm X100F for Street Photography, just read on!

Before we jump into the review though, I would like to remind you of our previous camera reviews that you might find interesting. We have written reviews on the, Fujifilm X-Pro2, the Fujifilm X-Pro1, the Ricoh GR, the Fujifilm X-T10, the Fujifilm X-T1, the Fujifilm X70 and the Canon EOS 6D.

As I have mentioned before in the past, all the cameras we review here on Streethunters.net are reviewed in a particular way and under specific circumstances. They are reviewed as street photography cameras specifically. We do not care less about pixel peeping, lens distortions, chromatic aberrations or anything like that. What matters as far as we are concerned is how the camera handles in the streets!

Now that this intro is over, let us look into the Fujifilm X100F for Street Photography!

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Guide to Minimalist street photography cover

Minimalism is all the rage right now. Spend any time reading blogs, flipping through cookery books or design magazines and virtually all you see are neat straight lines, uncluttered desks, and seas of overexposed whites. We can attribute this to all sorts of factors. For instance, modern web design is all about a light, clean look with lots of negative or ‘white’ space, so similarly themed photos fit perfectly with this style – ditto on Instagram, where, when reduced to a thumbnail, a neat, minimal image leaps out compared to a busy, intricate layered shot. IKEA built a flat pack empire furnishing our homes with smart, scandi styles, and part of Apple’s stratospheric rise to the colossus it is today can be attributed to Steve Jobs’ and Jony Ive’s obsession with minimalism, both through functionality (binning CD drives and ports), and through worship of the Bauhaus design school, and Dieter Rams’ incredible industrial design functionalism showcased by many classic Braun products. So, with minimalism so highly influential in all aspects of our life, how can we start channeling this look into our street photography? And, as we continue to admire all your superb submissions from last month’s minimalism themed street photography monthly theme contest, and marvel at the brilliance of our contest winner Achim Katzberg’s street shot, what could be more apposite than taking a look under the hood of minimalism to seeing what makes it tick? Read on for a minimalism primer in our guide to minimalist street photography

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Street Hunt video 27 - Bucharest, Romania

Introduction

Dear Streethunters.net Readers hello!

Today I am happy to present to you our latest Street Hunt video, Street Hunt No27 that we shot in Bucharest, Romania!

Older Street Hunt Videos

Before I continue, I would like to list all previous Street Hunt videos, in reverse order, for your convenience just in case you have missed them:

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The Right Camera for Street Photography Cover

Since I started street photography I have gone through many different cameras and it’s taken me this long to find the perfect one. I thought I would write this blog post to help people when choosing the right camera for street photography and my hope is it might stop you from making the same mistakes I did and in the process stop you from wasting money and your valuable time.

I have changed my camera many times over the past 6 years. I started my trip through the digital world of photography with the Nikon D300, then I moved onto the Fuji X100 (loved this camera), then back to Nikon and before moving to Fujifilm (which I’ve been using for the past 2 years) I tried Canon, Olympus and Leica. Why have I got through so many cameras? Well, first off it’s not easy finding a camera that you can get comfortable with straight away! Even if you are lucky enough to find a camera that you do find comfortable, it’s not to say that you won’t start looking for a new camera almost straight away (come on, we all do it!) it’s human nature to keep looking forward for the latest and greatest – hoping that we find something that is even better and more comfortable than what we have. That mythical magic bullet that will make us an awesome photographer.

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K&F Concept Camera Backpack Review Cover

Introduction

Finding the right camera bag for street photography is a very subjective choice. Some street photographers will prefer to travel light, heading out on the streets with just one camera and one lens in hand and a spare battery or memory card, whilst others will opt to carry the proverbial kitchen sink with them when out shooting – multiple cameras, lenses, flashes – the works. Personally I’ve always shied away from using a backpack for street photography as they have traditionally appeared a little overkill – hulking great black monstrosities festooned with zips, buckles and compartments that absolutely scream “I’m a camera nerd!”. Packed and bursting to the gunwales with a bit of camera gear for any eventuality, such backpacks for me epitomise the excesses of gear acquisition syndrome, and are exactly not what the street photographer needs. Plus I’ve harboured a somewhat irrational dislike for wearing backpacks ever since reading one of those dreadful style-magazine type articles which said a grown man should never be seen wearing a backpack – something about them making the wearer look like an overgrown schoolboy together with their excessively utilitarian appearance, which has also stuck with me.

As a result, I’ve always preferred the single strapped messenger bag style (practicality and back pain be damned!). For my street photography camera bag needs over the last few years I’ve been relying on the Lowepro Event Messenger 250 (with space for laptop and several cameras or lenses if I want them), or if travelling lighter, the nifty Cosyspeed Camslinger Streetomatic. But, things are changing. Backpacks are getting trendy – or at least it appears that way judging by the sheer number of Fjällräven Kånken backpacks I see being worn by students from my local art school. So, I figured it was time I put my initial misgivings aside and try a camera backpack for street photography. Something that looked more ‘casual street’ than Terminator-style uber photo machine. Enter the K&F Concept camera backpack.

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Tzen Sing Street Hunters Interview 1

Introduction

As Fall arrived in September of 2017, the temperatures started to cool, but the competition in our Monthly Theme Contests surely did not. The previous eight months had given us outstanding work from winners Roy Rozanski, Kristof Vande Velde, Christoph Wuzella, Sreejith Kaviyil, Zlatko Vickovic, Svilen NachevConstantinos Arvanitis and Jasmin Gendron. The quality of the work has made choosing a victor all the more challenging, and left us anxious to see what the next month’s theme would yield.

September marked the end of our five-month long run on color themes. The harvest month’s theme was perhaps the most challenging color yet… pink! How would this passionate color feature in a winning shot? Again, we were awash in a sea of spectacular color and the selection process was gloriously arduous. After the voting, it was the wildly talented Tzen Xing who captured the title for the month!