"How to" posts

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Plan street photo trip to a foreign country cover

Street Photography Abroad

Travelling is important for your street photography. It is not the be all and end all, and a great many street photographers consistently produce great bodies of work shooting in one location or home city. But for a great many other street photographers, travelling is an amazing way for them to get inspired, and if they travel specifically for their street photography, often gives them the time and opportunity to focus on their street photography that they wouldn’t normally have which is also very important. And all these factors are increased dramatically if your travelling for street photography extends to a foreign country. Everything becomes just that little bit more exciting and a little bit more exotic. At Streethunters.net we’ve been lucky enough to have enjoyed several opportunities to visit foreign countries for street photography, so we wanted to take the opportunity to share what we’ve learned along the way with you, so read on for our top tips for planning a street photography trip to a foreign country.

Find inspiration in street photography cover

I’m not afraid to admit that I am currently going through somewhat of a creative block with my street photography. I am feeling rather listless with regards to the street photos I have been creating of late, and not enjoying the process of shooting much either. Part of this stems from a feeling of general frustration I have with shooting in my hometown – I’ve mentioned before how I find it so much easier to shoot when I’m on the road, and why I think travelling is so important for street photography, but I can’t always rely on travelling to get me out of the gutter, nor can I think I can get away with being a purely fair weather street photographer (both in a literal sense and a metaphorical one). So, there are clearly times when I need to learn how to try and force myself to be more sharp and get the creative juices flowing. To develop as a street photographer I feel I need to be prolific, because virtually without fail the only way to get really good at something is practice at it really hard until it becomes second nature. To do that I need to be able to get myself in the zone and that means making the most of all my opportunities, but also trying out new methods to galvanise myself and think creatively in order to get inspired. So I’ve put together a list below of techniques I’m currently experimenting with to help myself out of a creative rut. If you’ve experienced similar problems of frustrations in shooting in your hometown, I highly recommend you give Spyros’ article on how to get over the boredom of shooting street photos in the same location every day. There is some overlap, but my list covers a mixture of things that include both activities out on the street and broader ways of changing my mindset, so hopefully something from this will work! Read on for more…

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Hip & LCD Shooting for Street Photography Cover

It’s a slightly controversial approach, and one that will have some purists up in arms, but I think hip shooting has an important role to play in street photography when deployed as part of your wider street photography shooting technique arsenal. With that mind, I thought I’d put together a short little of my top tips for the best results using the hip shot technique for street photography, plus an extra tidbit of advice that will come in handy for hip-level LCD shooting too. So dive into our guide to hip shooting in street photography and head on out to the streets! And if you want to see some examples of the hip shot street photography technique in action, don’t forget to check out a video of Spyros Papaspyropoulos on the streets of Rethymno, Crete in our Street Talk Episode 6 – The Hip Shot Technique in Street Photography.

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Keeping Track Street Photo Contests cover

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Jacint Juhasz exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


As I’m practicing street photography I find contests and different assignments very useful. Not only they help to find new topics within the street photography genre but also sometimes push me out of my comfort zone.

At this point I’m a member of more than 5 groups which have different weekly, bi-weekly or monthly contests, including StreetHunters.net. When I first joined these contest groups I tried to use different text files to keep track of the topics and also the deadlines, so I wouldn’t miss anything. However the text file based method was hard to maintain and also not really mobile friendly, which meant I couldn’t check the list when I was actually away from the computer. As I’m a control freak and “Getting Things Done” enthusiast in my 9-5 job, I figured a specific todo/task list would be perfect for this job!

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Ultimate Street Photography Hacks Cover

In our combined years of experience out shooting on the streets, the Streethunters.net team have picked up a thing or two. The more you practice your street photography, the more little tips and tricks you learn along the way. Things that might not seem obvious at first (or inversely, are blindingly obvious when you think about it), but that actually make a real improvement to your street photography experience. We’ve pooled our knowledge together to come up with a list for you, so strap yourselves in for the Street Hunters Ultimate Street Photography Hacks!

**Update!: This list has been updated with a couple of new hacks inspired by your suggestions, thank you!!**

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Street Photography Cloudy Weather Bad Light Cover

Ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone. As a street photographer from the UK I should be pretty familiar with my country’s glorious weather. But I must confess that the sight of a leaden grey cloud-filled sky still fills me with dread. And even more so if I’ve got my camera in hand. As someone who’s fallen in love with the magic potential of powerful natural light my shoulders drop when it’s cloudy, and I lose my mojo. But I’ve resolved to do better, as I can’t forsake all the photo opportunities out there just because the weather is pants. And living in the UK, with our miserable weather, I can’t afford to either, as I can’t expect all that much sun year round here. So, if you’d like to join me on my quest to better my street photography when the clouds come rolling in, read on for my top tips for street photography in cloudy weather and flat light. And, if you’re a really hardy soul who’s not in the mood to let a spot of rain dampen your spirits, don’t forget to check out my tips for street photography in rain and bad weather too.

Lorenzo Grifantini Beach Street Photography cover

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Lorenzo Grifantini exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


Italian Summer – A Beach Street Photography Project

I took these pictures in different places around Italy—like the island of Salina in Sicily, Salento in Puglia, and Forte dei Marmi in Tuscany. I looked at people of all ages and social stations hoping to find that one common thread of surreal irony. In these difficult times for my country Italian summer is the season when Italians can express their lightness of being and their love for life. Also, as an Italian expat who has lived in London for more than ten years, I can finally see my cultural traits spread out on the beaches of Italy and that evokes strong childhood memories for me of the long happy summers I spent there.

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Going Public: Putting Your Street Photos Online Cover

I’d like to write about a particularly important decision in a street photographer’s journey, and one that isn’t considered and covered enough I feel. It’s something that’s become more and more easier, and definitely more significant in the modern age, and with the all-encompassing encroachment of the internet into every aspect of our lives. I’m talking about the decision to ‘go public’ and put your work out there, and start to sell yourself as a street photographer.

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Fujifilm X-Pro1 Off Camera Flash

As you may or not know, I recently made the decision to swap my DSLR for a mirrorless camera for street photography. One of the huge benefits to using DSLR cameras for photographers – and particularly DSLRs manufactured by the ‘big hitters’ Canon and Nikon – is the massive ecosystem of supported accessories available for these cameras. DSLR technology has well and truly matured now, and the fact that DSLRs have been widely used in the professional sphere for well over a decade means that supported accessories for these cameras (and most importantly a flash system) are easy to come by. By contrast mirrorless cameras as a professional and prosumer tool are newer arrivals on the block, and the flash accessories for these cameras are still developing and being refined.

Fujifilm X-Pro1 Off Camera Flash

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Off Cam Flash in Street Photography

Introduction

Stuck in a rut with your street photography? Looking for a way to add drama and pop to your images? Want to make some up close and personal “in your face” shots like the Magnum maestro Bruce Gilden? Are you yearning to practice some fast street photography at night but can’t afford to shell out for a new low-light monster camera or a fast lens? Then read this guide for how to make some great street photography shots very cheaply using an off-camera flash!!