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Under the influence of Weegee

Introduction

The line between photojournalism and street photography can be a blurry one. Though there are clearly defined examples of each, some work straddles the line. The determining factor on how you categorize one of those images depends solely on your definition of each. Some say everything is street, and other types of photography, like photojournalism, are just a sub-genres of it. Others say street is a bastard child of photojournalism. But does it really matter? The question, in my book, is tired. Just like film vs.digital and color vs. mono. However, we like categories. Categories make things easy. Easy to market and easy to consume.

Long before there was social media and a “need” for such debate, there was Weegee. Weegee didn’t care about the line. He crossed it, went back over it and, at times, erased it.

Weegee, the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig(1899-1968), was the original tabloid photographer. His claim to fame was his stark and gritty New York City crime scene photos, along with his images of fires, car wrecks and other tragedies. But buried underneath his shocking news photos was a lovely portfolio of street work.

Fellig got his break into photojournalism in the 1930’s, breaking out of his job working in the darkroom at Acme photos, a stock photo company. He would go out at night and photograph crime scenes while the staff photographers slept, but he never received credit for his work from the stock company. Going freelance, he then developed a relationship with the Manhattan Police Department.

Photo of the week by Yanidel

Street Photo of the week by Yanidel

Yanick Delafoge or as he is better know as Yanidel, is an international Street Photographer that has been shooting in the streets for quite some time. Originally from Orbe, Switzerland Yanidel now resides in central Argentina. When he first got interested in Street Photography he was in Paris, where he captured moments for four years. He has a very large portfolio from the capital of France with some beautiful images. After that 4 year period of shooting Paris ended, he decided to go around the world in 80 weeks with the primary goal of shooting Street Photography. His travels took him to Myanmar, India, Cuba, Turkey, Australia, Japan, Mexico, Venice, Thailand, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and finally Argentina. During his trips he managed to take many photographs and his overall portfolio grew in both quantity and quality.

According to Yanidel himself:

I consider myself part of the Humanist tradition yet, diverging from a purely documentary approach, I try to give a surrealist and lyric dimension to the little facts of our daily life, trying to blend in some humour and a positive spin from time to time.

Yanidel has had his work exhibited and has been interviewed many times by blogs and magazines. He has also released a book, that you can read about on his website. Besides being a talented and prolific Street Photographer, Yanick Delafoge is in my opinion one of the most influential Street Photographers I know of. I have written about him previously in my blog post “The 10 most Influential Active Street Photographers”. The amount of photographs he has to share and the free knowledge he gives away on his website is priceless. Yanidel’s was the first Street Photography blog I had ever found on the web that had such useful content.

Introduction

Although it’s been documented that Garry Winogrand was not a fan of the label “street photographer”, there is absolutely no doubt he was a master. His body of work speaks to this and will stand as a testament to it for all time. Winogrand considered himself simply a “photographer”. He didn’t attach any other adjective to the noun. But, and probably much to his dismay, we have to consider him one of the greatest street photographers of all time. And it can also be argued that he is the greatest ever. But photography or street photography is not a competition. It’s not about how many fantastic photos you produce, or how many exhibitions you have our how many books you publish. Photography, at it’s core is personal. It feeds a hunger to create. To document. To share. However, that being said, Winogrand not only satisfied his creative drive, but he did it in great volume and with great artistic vision and skill. The man was prolific and incredibly talented.

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Sanja Buterin intro photo

Introduction

A while back we published a post called “The 10 most Influential Active Street Photographers“ that was about the 10 Street Photographers that are still active and that influence the Street Photography world in one way or another. Some might inspire with their work, others with the expertise and others with their overall contribution. No matter how though, the important thing is that all the people listed in the post have something to offer to the Street Photography Community. Even though most of the comments we received were positive, we also had the odd troll here and there, one of the most common asked questions was why are there no ladies listed. At first we got this question asked on Social Media Networks and then our Readers asked us on our website. Well, the answer is that we never noticed until you told us. That means that during our research we didn’t choose to look only at the work of male Street Photographers, it just happens that male Street Photographers are more active. It is just something that is what it is. What I am trying to say is that we didn’t leave out the ladies deliberately. Those comments though sparked an interest in us. We searched the internet looking for a list of Lady Street Photographers but we couldn’t seem to find one. So, we thought that since we had been asked by our Readers to add more ladies in our “The 10 most Influential Active Street Photographers“, why not make a separate post with a list of Inspirational lady Street Photographers. So, we did our research and today StreetHunters.net presents you with “25 Inspirational Ladies of Street Photography”.

Under the Influence of Vivian Maier

Introduction

As photographers, we’ve all been influenced by another photographer’s work. Their images stoked our creative fire. They spoke to us, awakening the very spirit that drives us to do what we do. Somewhere deep within us all, that spirit was buried until our eyes found their treasures. Then we found ourselves compelled. Compelled to pick up a camera for the first time. Compelled to try street photography. Compelled to emulate them. And then, and perhaps most importantly, compelled to create our own style. These titans of their craft gave us the greatest gift an artist can give… inspiration. This series is an homage to these great photographers. Some passed and some who still walk among us. With each artist, I’ll focus on one aspect of their work that has had a deep impact on me. For the first installment, I present to you… Vivian Maier.

Introduction

In the last year I have found myself wanting to learn more and more about photography. Books are always a great resource, as are also YouTube videos and blogs. But, I found that I needed something that would give me a ton of objective knowledge in a short amount of time. So, I thought that I should check and see what documentaries I could find online or on DVD that I could watch. Documentaries are always a rich and most of the times objective source of knowledge. So I did some digging and I found many resources that suggested various photography documentaries. I read some online reviews to help me make a short list of the utmost best choices and then I proceeded with watching them, one by one. Today, I am going to share this list with you, because I believe that every Street Photographer should watch these films and enrich their historical and practical knowledge of photography.

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Introduction

So, what is Street Photography? I’m not going to get into genres, types of street photography, history of street photography or what is, or isn’t, considered street photography as these subjects have been talked about, discussed, agreed/disagreed and argued over so much in the past, present and, no doubt, in the future too.

Besides, who am I to decide what is, or isn’t, street photography?

So, what I want to write about is what street photography is to me personally. What it has done for me personally and what I choose to photograph and not to photograph.