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Street Photography Image Problem Cover

ATTENTION

The following views do not necessarily represent the views of the whole StreetHunters team.


As I fire off another frame because I’m out ‘shooting on the streets’ and I feel compelled to, I often wonder just what the point of it all is. The same feeling often pervades me as I browse through my Lightroom catalogue. Hundreds and thousands of street photos but just what am I striving for? When I get into this kind of mindset I often begin to think about the concept of street photography as a whole, and the more I do, the more I begin to wonder about the genre itself, whether there are some real issues that need addressing, and specifically, does street photography have an image problem?

I edited this blog post on 6/5/2017 to include a reference to an article by Michael Sweet which I had forgotten about – thank you to Karen Commings for the reminder!

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Streetfoto San Francisco 2017 Cover

StreetFoto San Francisco has returned for its second annual festival, and 2017’s installment is shaping up to be even more impressive than the inaugural event! Late spring is going to get hot in the Bay Area!

Billed as an international event dedicated entirely to the art of street photography, StreetFoto San Francisco will surely deliver on that promise with contests, portfolio reviews, workshops, lectures, photowalks and exhibitions. Better yet is the list of great street photographers hosting some of the events: Bruce Gilden, Jesse Marlow, Aaron Berger, Jack Simon, and Vineet Vohra. And, some of these greats will be judging the contests along with David Gibson, Maciej Dakowicz, Graciela Magnoni, Nick Turpin, Siri Thompson, Alexander Petrosyan, Judy Walgren, Joe Aguirre and more to be announced!

Boogie ‘Blow Your Mind’ Exhibition in Naples cover

Read almost anything on the photographer Boogie and you’ll get the impression that he is one very brave and badass photographer. That’s because he is, in fact, just that. And all the press and praise… it’s justified. We here at StreetHunters know. His latest book, ‘A Wah Do Dem’ (Drago, 2016) was reviewed here and he was also featured in the Under The Influence series). Boogie was also on our inaugural list of most influential active street photographers. But all the words written do not really do Boogie’s work justice. The proof, as they say, is in the pudding. His work does all the talking.

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Ultimate Street Photography Hacks Cover

In our combined years of experience out shooting on the streets, the Streethunters.net team have picked up a thing or two. The more you practice your street photography, the more little tips and tricks you learn along the way. Things that might not seem obvious at first (or inversely, are blindingly obvious when you think about it), but that actually make a real improvement to your street photography experience. We’ve pooled our knowledge together to come up with a list for you, so strap yourselves in for the Street Hunters Ultimate Street Photography Hacks!

**Update!: This list has been updated with a couple of new hacks inspired by your suggestions, thank you!!**

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Helen Levitt Book Cover

One thing that is often lost in discussion about street photography is the importance of the genre. When talking with and about contemporary photographers, I find that it is hardly discussed at all. The importance is more than a groundbreaking style. It is also more than say, the introduction of color to the genre. There is historical importance. Street photography, particularly candid street scenes, give us a sample of real life from that period in time. It is a historical document as much as straight documentary photography. It can be argued that maybe candid street is just as “real”. It’s unfiltered. Un-posed. Discreet and unobtrusive. Of course, we don’t talk about the work of current photographers in this aspect because they’re creating future nostalgia. Its historical value is almost implied. An afterthought, if a thought at all.

Vineet Vohra

As mentioned previously here at Streethunters, the Brussels Street Photography Festival is fast approaching, coming to the spectacular city On October 28th. Among the events happening are workshops with internationally acclaimed photographers. Hosting one of the workshops are two great shooters from India, Vineet and Rohit Vohra!

The Vohra brothers are no strangers here at Streethunters HQ. Rohit has made the reader-sourced list, The 20 Most Influential Street Photographers in 2015 and Vineet was voted to the list in both 2015 and 2016. Together they are presenting their three-day workshop, ‘The Art Of Storytelling’ at the festival. The workshop will run from October 28th through the 30th. It is limited to 18 participants and will be presented in English.

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Brussels Street Photography Festival Logo

A blockbuster street photography event is on the horizon and its dates on your calendar should definitely be highlighted. Be sure to mark October 28-30 for the Brussels Street Photography Festival!

The festival bills itself as a cultural project whose objective is to promote street photography as an urban research tool, a form of cultural communication and a visual art. And by the looks of what the organizers have plated, it will do just that. The festival’s main ambition is to provide an international platform that looks at Brussels through the fresh eyes of its citizens and engaged photographers, inspired by the city’s urban landscape.

Under the Influence of Robert Frank

Introduction

Just a week ago, I did a review of Robert Frank’s The Americans. Looking back, it’s easy to see how that book has been, and continues to be influential. It was a game-changer. But what about Frank himself? Robert Frank, the photographer?

“When people look at my pictures I want them to feel the way they do when they want to read the line of a poem twice,”

Frank said in LIFE magazine over sixty years ago. Considering the staying power of The Americans, first published in 1958, it is safe to say that he achieved that goal.

Who is Robert Frank?

Robert Frank, born 1924 in Switzerland, came to New York in 1947. He had already trained as a commercial studio photographer in Switzerland and produced his own, hand-made book, 46 Fotos. In New York, he got a job at the Harper’s Bazaar. He worked there briefly as a fashion photographer, but quickly grew dissatisfied with the deadlines and control of magazine employment. He left to travel and photograph in South America and Europe, producing another hand-made book. Eventually, he returned to New York and worked as a freelance photojournalist.

In 1953, Frank met Walker Evans, of American Photographs fame, and with his help, secured the Guggenheim fellowship for his project that resulted in The Americans. The book’s impact still causes ripples to this day.

Photo of the week by Stuart Paton

Street Photo of the week by Stuart Paton

This week we are featuring a photograph by Street Photographer Stuart Paton. Stuart Paton is originally from Scotland, UK. These days he shoots and lives in France.

Stuart has been interested in photography since he was a child. His dad used to have a dark room under the stairs in their home. Once Stuart had an understanding of photography, developing and printing he started using that darkroom to print his own photos. His father was his inspiration and the person who stimulated his interest in the art of image making, as well as the influential work of war photographer Don McCullin.

Stuart’s work came to our attention through our ever growing Flickr Group. We feel very lucky that we have such a vast library of amazing photos at our fingertips.

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Colour in Street Photography

I’ve been thinking about this topic for some time, and Alexander Merc’s Guest Post last week on the Battle of Street Photography further inspired me. Unsurprisingly, as a member of Street Hunters, one way and another, I see quite a lot of street photos every day. The photos I see are a mix of street shots submitted by the established street photography big hitters, photos presented by up-and-coming street photographers, and photos from those just starting out on their street photography journey. The work I see is at all kinds of levels – some of it totally blows me away, at other times I can clearly see when a photographer needs more time and practice to develop their skills.

The Problem With Black and White Street Photography

There is something in particular that I identify more often than not in a street photographer’s work, and it’s often particularly evident in a street photographer who’s at an early stage in their photographic journey. I’m talking about shooting street photographs exclusively in black and white. Or as I see it, neglecting the importance of colour in a street photography. I firmly believe that some photographers when they first start out with street photography are holding themselves back by shooting exclusively in monochrome, and they should really consider using colour.