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Influential Street Photographers Updated

Update

After quite a few suggestions from you, the StreetHunters.net Readers, we added an extra section at the bottom of the post called “Influential Active Street Photographers recommended by our Readers”. Enjoy!


Introduction

During the past years Street Photography has become widely accepted as a form of art and expression. More and more people have learned to appreciate it and to understand how hard it is to get it right. The reason why Street Photography has become more mainstream is because of some influential few that have managed to spread the word about it through their style, their blogs, their videos and their constant sharing of their experiences. These few Street Photographers that share their ideas with the rest of the world, their methods and their passion for the art have transformed Street Photography into what it is today.

The StreetHunters.net team decided to make a list of those influencers as a way to say “thank you” for their contribution to the world of Street Photography. We understand that some of you dear StreetHunters.net Readers might not agree with some of the names being on this list. We also understand if you feel like it must be longer, or shorter. But, no matter what each and every one of us thinks, it is certain that every single Street Photographer presented here today, has helped re-shape Street Photography as we know it. So here goes:

Inside Dionisis Limperopoulos' Camera Bag - Bag No. 174

ATTENTION – Send us your camera bags!

If you want to participate, please read the rules of participation at the end of the post.
Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!


Inside Dionisis Limperopoulos’ Camera bag! (Bag No174)

“Hello Street Hunters,

My name is Dionisis Limperopoulos and I am a 24 year old photography enthusiast based in Patras, Greece. It’s been a year since I grabbed my first camera and the love for photography is growing stronger every minute since then. The main photographic genres that I love practicing are Street, Landscape and Product photography.

When I am trying to create street photos I use exclusively film cameras with prime lenses for one main reason, every click counts. It’s been a great way to improve my skills since I have to think twice before the shutter is released. Composition, framing, exposure and timing have to be precise because there is no way to correct your mistakes.

The photographers who inspire me are Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alex Webb, John Free, Vivian Maier, Robert Frank, Paul Strand, Nikos Oikonomopoulos and Arnold Newman.

Hope one day I will capture the decisive moment.

The contents of my camera bag:”

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Photos by London based Street Photographer Becky Frances

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


‘Like Chaplin Does’

Silhouettes, shadows and solitary figures traipsing through winter rain have long been staples of street photography.

But they’re not everyone’s cup of tea.

Street Photographers as diverse as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliot Erwitt and Tavepong Pratoomwong have long championed the ‘brighter side’ to life, incorporating humour, comedy and a sense of the absurd into their work.

Erwitt in particular held humour in high regard, claiming:

“Making people laugh is one of the highest achievements you can have. And when you can make them laugh and cry, alternately, like Chaplin does, now that’s the highest of all possible achievements. I don’t know that I aim for it, but I recognize it as the supreme goal.”

But this goal of making people laugh ‘Like Chaplin does’ is harder than it appears.

Many of us struggle to express humour through our photography, resorting instead to the tried and tested trends of existential despair and postmodern misery.

With such cheery thoughts in mind, Street Hunters turned to one of London’s leading street photographers – Becky Frances – for some helpful tips and advice.

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Guide to Minimalist street photography cover

Minimalism is all the rage right now. Spend any time reading blogs, flipping through cookery books or design magazines and virtually all you see are neat straight lines, uncluttered desks, and seas of overexposed whites. We can attribute this to all sorts of factors. For instance, modern web design is all about a light, clean look with lots of negative or ‘white’ space, so similarly themed photos fit perfectly with this style – ditto on Instagram, where, when reduced to a thumbnail, a neat, minimal image leaps out compared to a busy, intricate layered shot. IKEA built a flat pack empire furnishing our homes with smart, scandi styles, and part of Apple’s stratospheric rise to the colossus it is today can be attributed to Steve Jobs’ and Jony Ive’s obsession with minimalism, both through functionality (binning CD drives and ports), and through worship of the Bauhaus design school, and Dieter Rams’ incredible industrial design functionalism showcased by many classic Braun products. So, with minimalism so highly influential in all aspects of our life, how can we start channeling this look into our street photography? And, as we continue to admire all your superb submissions from last month’s minimalism themed street photography monthly theme contest, and marvel at the brilliance of our contest winner Achim Katzberg’s street shot, what could be more apposite than taking a look under the hood of minimalism to seeing what makes it tick? Read on for a minimalism primer in our guide to minimalist street photography

Featured street photo by Peter Kool

Featured Street Photo by Peter Kool

Peter Kool is one of my all time favourite contemporary street photographers. His style is surreal and he pays great attention to detail. What I like about his photographs is that you need to ‘decode’ them to get them. Some are easier to understand than others and can be analysed in split seconds, but others take a little bit more time and those are the ones that I enjoy look at the most.

Peter was born on the 30th January in 1953 in the Netherlands. Since 1973 he has been living in Belgium where he still resides today. He studied photography at the Academy of Fine Arts at Sint-Niklaas Belgium from 1980 to 1985. Even though he studied photography he didn’t dedicate his life to it until a few years ago, but since then he hasn’t lost focus.

Peter Kool is a member of the iN-PUBLiC Street Photography collective, the first ever street photography collective. In the past we have featured other members of iN-PUBLiC such as Matt Stuart, Blake Andrews, Maciej Dakowicz, Mark Powell, Narelle Autio and Trent Parke. You should surely visit his bio page on In-Public and give it a read.

Jon Luvellis work in exhibition at the State Historical Society of Missouri permanent art collection

Jon Luvelli is an acclaimed street photographer that is based in Missouri a state in the Midwestern United States. If you are a regular reader of the Streethunters.net website you will remember Luvelli’s work from some of our previous posts.

In 2015 we wrote a feature on his photo “Horns”, in 2016 we wrote a review about his book “One Block” and in that same year he was voted as one of the most influential street photographers of that year by you, our readers.

Today we would like to share with you some exciting news about him. The State Historical Society of Missouri, recognising Luvelli’s fine art photography and his contribution to the portrayal of Midwestern rural townscapes, will be sharing a selection of his work in their permanent art collection. The first installment of photographs is on display now at the State Historical Society’s Columbia art gallery.

"A boy and his doll" by Jon Luvelli
“A boy and his doll” by Jon Luvelli

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Nicholas Gooden Interview for Street Hunters by Timothy Lunn

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


Introduction

You’ve just taken a fantastic photograph.

Great composition. Dramatic lighting. Bold tones.

But how do you share it?

We’ve all made mistakes with social media. Whether it was chasing a trend, posting ‘like for like’ or plastering a photo with more hashtags than an Instagram sunset, it’s not easy to draw the line between self-promotion and self-importance!

So how do we share a photograph responsibly?

To help answer this question, StreetHunters talked to a leading London Street Photographer and Director of Marketing, Nicholas Goodden.

Vineet Vohra Rome Workshop cover

The Italian Street Photo Festival, a cultural project and the first real international festival of street photography in Italy is coming to Rome this April. The festival will include talks, photowalks, contests, portfolio reviews and exhibitions. Also, the festival will include workshops and one of them is being led by one of the consistently great street photographers, Vineet Vohra.

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This Week Streethunters.net 9/10/17-15/10/17

Introduction

You’re joining us for the latest edition of ‘This Week on Streethunters.net’, our Sunday summary of the past week’s events and activity on the Streethunters.net street photography blog website and social media channels. If you fancy heading even further back, you can visit the This Week category page of the website and browse through summaries from the previous weeks.

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PHoS Street Photo Seminar 2017 Athens

We here at Street Hunters are pleased to announce that we will be participating in PhoS in Athens, the first and only free street photography colloquium in Greece, made by you for you, talented street photographers!

Over the course of three days from 10th-12th November 2017, PhoS will feature workshops, talks, portfolio reviews, walks, contests, exhibitions and more, and all of these will be free of charge! The festival in Athens will feature the best from both Greek and international street photography, all over the course of one weekend. We here at Street Hunters are proud to be participating with the other event organizers: the online magazine iFocus, BULB photo collective and SCP (Street Core Photography) community.