Tags Posts tagged with "Street Photography Tips"

Street Photography Tips

7 Tips for Reluctant Street Photographer Cover

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Hamish Gill from 35mmc exclusively for www.streethunters.net.


Street photography – at least as I think it’s commonly understood – is something I wouldn’t ever say I aspire toward. For a start, I’m not sure I really know what street photography is! It’s such a broad term that seems to get applied to such a vast array of different sub-fields of photography that it’s quite hard to put a finger on.

To my mind, what most people – or at very least the layman – think of when they hear the term street photography is probably closer to the output of the likes of Bruce Gilden. But of course this isn’t really that accurate. The broader field of street photography seems to have laid claim to all sorts of sub-fields of photography. Take Fan Ho for example. I’ve repeatedly read of Fan Ho being classified as ‘street’, but look at his most famous works, and then compare them to Gilden’s. Unless you’re some sort of history of art type with a masters in bullshit, you’re probably going to find it quite hard to find much parity. Both shot/shoot a lot of black & white, both are highly regarded within their respective sub-fields of street photography, yet in pretty much every way they are different in terms of style and output. Gilden is brash and heavy handed, whereas Ho was contemplative, and produced work that feels gentle and light in its touch.

Not only is the field of street photography broad, but also – perhaps because of so many of the greats being easy to classify as such – it’s a very difficult field to find solid a footing within, never mind master. It’s gotta be incredibly difficult to do anything that stands proud amongst so much incredible work. In fact, the moment you classify yourself as a “street photographer” you’re automatically classifying yourself amongst such a vast sea of greatness, where do you even start to attempt to make a mark?

Street photography is a type of photography that aims to document everyday life. If you’re set to master street photography, give these tips a go and you’ll be on the right track.

Unlike other types of photography, street photography is generally about taking candid photos of people in public. It aims to capture stories and emotions without the influence of the photographer, which is, let’s all face it, not an easy thing to master.

But don’t lose hope! Every great photographer starts somewhere. To help you get started on your journey to becoming an impressive street photographer, follow these essential tips.

by -
4 4973
Ultimate Street Photography Hacks Cover

In our combined years of experience out shooting on the streets, the Streethunters.net team have picked up a thing or two. The more you practice your street photography, the more little tips and tricks you learn along the way. Things that might not seem obvious at first (or inversely, are blindingly obvious when you think about it), but that actually make a real improvement to your street photography experience. We’ve pooled our knowledge together to come up with a list for you, so strap yourselves in for the Street Hunters Ultimate Street Photography Hacks!

**Update!: This list has been updated with a couple of new hacks inspired by your suggestions, thank you!!**

by -
4 3641
Street Photography Cloudy Weather Bad Light Cover

Ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone. As a street photographer from the UK I should be pretty familiar with my country’s glorious weather. But I must confess that the sight of a leaden grey cloud-filled sky still fills me with dread. And even more so if I’ve got my camera in hand. As someone who’s fallen in love with the magic potential of powerful natural light my shoulders drop when it’s cloudy, and I lose my mojo. But I’ve resolved to do better, as I can’t forsake all the photo opportunities out there just because the weather is pants. And living in the UK, with our miserable weather, I can’t afford to either, as I can’t expect all that much sun year round here. So, if you’d like to join me on my quest to better my street photography when the clouds come rolling in, read on for my top tips for street photography in cloudy weather and flat light. And, if you’re a really hardy soul who’s not in the mood to let a spot of rain dampen your spirits, don’t forget to check out my tips for street photography in rain and bad weather too.

by -
6 2708
Street Photo Sins & How I Overcome Them Cover

Street Photography, like so many disciplines, is all about ebbs and flows, peaks and troughs. Days when everything goes swimmingly, and days when you wonder what the bloody point is, and why you’re putting yourself through this torture! That’s certainly the case for me anyway. I’m starting to learn that, like so many things in life, success (or even happiness) in street photography can often be down to your attitude, preparation, and skill. So I wanted to share with you what I’ve learned so far about my worst street photography habits, and what I try do to overcome them. So read on for my street photography deadly sins and how I avoid the temptation of falling into their traps.

by -
3 3923
Top Tips for Street Photography in Rain & Bad Weather

Introduction

This time last year Spyros Papaspyropoulos wrote a set of tips and suggestions for summer street photography projects for all you street photographers to have a go at if you’re lucky enough to be able to get away for your summer holidays. If you’re familiar with that list, you may remember Spyros made lots of suggestions for street photography on the beach, and even in the sea! Now that’s all well and good, as Spyros lives in Greece, and he knows his summer will have the characteristics of an actual summer – i.e., sunny! But not everyone can count on the summer weather, and being British I understand that as well as anyone! As I write this, the UK set to be battered by gale force winds and rain sweeping in from the Atlantic, and my hometown is enduring rain and temperatures of around 15 degrees (60F). So in a gesture of solidarity to those who live in countries with summers that aren’t much to write home about, I thought I’d offer some street photography tips, suggestions, and project ideas for rainy and cloudy weather. Those of you reading this in more extreme weather conditions in the middle of an icy winter should also check out Andrew Sweigart’s guide to winter weather street photography to learn how best to practice street photography in the most adverse of weather conditions. If you’re well prepared there’s no reason to let a day’s bad weather ruin your planned street hunt! So read on for more….

by -
6 7562

NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Yiannis Yiasaris for www.streethunters.net.
Edited by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.


Introduction

Ultra wide angles are very difficult to master. Especially in Street Photography if you are not prepared to get close and personal with your subject and when I say close I mean like two lovers with a glass of wine shared between them, then my advice is to try with a longer focal length.

However if you choose to get close, you will be rewarded with some beautiful cinematic pictures with a strong sense of drama.

One of the hardest things with an ultra wide lens when shooting on the street, is to correctly place your subject into the frame. The reason for this is because wide angle lenses have the ability to “suck everything into your frame” and most of the times some unwanted elements slip in unnoticed that can totally destroy your composition and your photograph. The slightest miscalculation that could bring you a few cm closer or further away from your subject, could have a huge impact on the final result.

Another important thing that you should have in mind when going ultra wide, is the relationship between your subject and your background. What you should remember is that the closer you are to your subject, the further your background is pushed away.

Below I share with you 6 Tips for shooting Ultra Wide Angle Street Photography that I have picked up along the years . I hope you find them useful.