Tags Posts tagged with "André Kertész"

André Kertész

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Introduction

So as always the best laid plans of mice and men have gone awry, and it has now been almost six or so weeks since the last ‘This Week’ – our summaries of the latest goings on with the Streethunters.net blog and social media channels. With Christmas fast approaching, and our editorial team readying ourselves for a short break to recharge our batteries, we wanted to give a really quick rundown of the events of the last month and half if you’ve missed anything. So strap yourselves in, and get ready for a whistle-stop tour!

Washington Square New York 1954 by Andre Kertesz promo

Street Photo of the week by André Kertész

One of the most iconic figures of Photography that ever lived was the Grand Master André Kertész. Experimental by nature with a great understanding of the light, André Kertész managed to shine in the photography world at the very early stages of his career. He was born in Hungary in the late 19th century and was hugely recognised by his contemporary fellow photographers as a highly experienced and unique artist. The way he manipulated light and composition was way ahead of his time. He first started taking photos at the age of eighteen in Hungary and then continued taking photos after that for the rest of his long life. In the 1920’s-1930’s he rocked Paris with his amazing captures of the city so much that his work was published many times and he captured the attention of writers, fellow photographers and more. André Kertész managed to captivate his viewers through his interesting angles, his light, his compositions and his feeling. His photos were truly art and he would create that art anywhere. In a foreign country, or from his balcony it made no difference to him. He always managed to capture an unforgettable image.

André Kertész

Introduction

Street Photography, at it’s absolute best, has soul. Timelessness. To catch that soul, that moment, is the goal of any photographer. The formula that makes that moment is complex. It’s a frantic computation of light, time and action. However, it’s one that I often disregard. Instead, I let the world around me dictate what’s going to be shot, doing the math for me. And sometimes, it’s about being invisible, as well. To be the observer. To go unnoticed, even if up to only the very last possible moment. What better way to get that soul? What better way to take what the world around us offers you? André Kertész mastered this, stealing bits of soul and beauty from the world while rarely interacting with the subjects in his view. He made visual poetry. And, in my opinion, was the foundation on which the advancement of great street photography was built upon.