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Ultimate Street Photography Hacks Cover

In our combined years of experience out shooting on the streets, the Streethunters.net team have picked up a thing or two. The more you practice your street photography, the more little tips and tricks you learn along the way. Things that might not seem obvious at first (or inversely, are blindingly obvious when you think about it), but that actually make a real improvement to your street photography experience. We’ve pooled our knowledge together to come up with a list for you, so strap yourselves in for the Street Hunters Ultimate Street Photography Hacks!

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Introduction

Shooting at festivals, fairs, carnivals and the like can be a mixed bag for a street photographer. The obvious benefit of shooting at these events is the bang-for-your-buck factor. What I mean by this is there’s a large amount of people in a relatively small space. It’s a target-rich environment that offers big value for the street shooter. Providing great opportunities to sharpen skills, these events are a godsend to the photographer who doesn’t live in an active urban setting or is pressed for free time to shoot. The only drawback I’ve seen with collections of festival shots is the feeling of sameness, that I’m left with. Often, I’ve seen what amounts to be hodgepodge clusters of “character” shots. Now some are excellent quality, depicting some truly unique and colorful characters. However, quite a few groups of these photos fail to capture the atmosphere, flavor or spirit of these events. There’s a lack of “moments”.

Chris J MacDonald’s ‘Field Of Dreams’

That being said, receiving Chris J MacDonald’s ‘Field Of Dreams’ zine in the post was a delightful surprise and a visual treat. Self-published this past fall, ‘Field Of Dreams’ is a brief, but gloriously colorful and vivid essay on British summer music festival culture. In just 23 images, MacDonald taps into the essence of these festivals with an entertaining mix of characters and moments.

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Street Hunt 22

Introduction

Dear  Streethunters.net Readers hello!

Today I am happy to present to you the new Street Hunt #22 video that we shot in Iraklio, Crete. I know you have all been eagerly awaiting a new street hunt video since we released the street hunt video of the 2nd Annual Street Hunters Meeting in London back in September. The reason it’s taken us so long to publish this new street hunt is because we managed to record a total of 16GB in video files during our day that needed processing and editing and synchronising with the hundreds of photos we shot. We had to go through every photo we each took, time stamp them by the second, and then splice them in with the footage! The amount of work required was massive and it took me several months to complete. I guess, if this was my full time job, I could have had it ready much sooner, but I worked on the video late at night after work, so that was the best I could do under the circumstances.

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Street Photography Cloudy Weather Bad Light Cover

Ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone. As a street photographer from the UK I should be pretty familiar with my country’s glorious weather. But I must confess that the sight of a leaden grey cloud-filled sky still fills me with dread. And even more so if I’ve got my camera in hand. As someone who’s fallen in love with the magic potential of powerful natural light my shoulders drop when it’s cloudy, and I lose my mojo. But I’ve resolved to do better, as I can’t forsake all the photo opportunities out there just because the weather is pants. And living in the UK, with our miserable weather, I can’t afford to either, as I can’t expect all that much sun year round here. So, if you’d like to join me on my quest to better my street photography when the clouds come rolling in, read on for my top tips for street photography in cloudy weather and flat light. And, if you’re a really hardy soul who’s not in the mood to let a spot of rain dampen your spirits, don’t forget to check out my tips for street photography in rain and bad weather too.

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Thomas Ludwig 'Keep The Focus' review cover

We are not at a loss for educational access these days. For the knowledge seekers who are fortunate to have access, this is an amazing time to be alive. The internet, despite all its garbage and noise, is an invaluable and seemingly inexhaustible resource. Information on nearly anything is just a click away. If you’re in your fourth decade like me, you remember back to the time when this was not the case. Back to those pre-internet days when books, glorious books, nestled in their loving libraries, held the answers to the questions we sought. When we wanted to learn how to do something, that know-how had to be gleaned from books or taught by an instructor.

But, this is the internet age and we are fortunate enough to have the web at our beck and call. If we want to learn how to do something, anything, we can surely find a way with a Google search. It’s that easy. Articles, videos, podcasts… they’re all out there. From cooking to car repair to writing a novel and even raising a baby, there’s instruction out there.

Introduction

Dear Readers,

Last week I shared with my fellow Streethunters.net editors, Andrew Sweigart and Digby Fullam a new idea that I had. This idea is something that in my opinion will make the Streethunters.net YouTube channel a little bit more interesting and active. Both of them embraced the idea and since then I have been wanting to share it with all of you.

It is now one week later and believe it or not, I have only just found the time to properly sit down and write this announcement post for you all to read. I am currently at the Athens International Airport typing away on my laptop while waiting to board my flight back to Crete. I have been flying from location to location for work since early Tuesday morning, within Greece and further away. I have felt the bitter cold of the northern Balkans and flown in a propeller plane (something I am not used to doing), had food poisoning, met at least 20 new people and I did all these things wearing a suit 24/7. A crazy, uncomfortable 4 days!

Anyway, enough of my travels. Today is the announcement day, so let’s get on with it.

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10 Reasons I Love Street Photography Digby cover

I have been dreading this day. You have probably noticed that we three Streethunters editors take it in turns to write a ‘big’ article every week. We call them feature posts, and it’s a chance for us to wax lyrical about anything street photography we like. Andrew will often put out an awesome book review or a comprehensive under the influence analysis of some cracking street photographer, and Spyros will review some street photography gear, launch a new street hunt video, or debrief about the latest street photography jaunt he’s been on. Well, this week was my turn, and I had nothing. Zilch. Nada. I was utterly bereft of ideas of what to write about. I’ve had some things going on over the last few weeks which has meant that street photography has had to take a bit of a back seat. Without being able to get out and about with my camera I’ve been a bit stuck for inspiration. So I started to look through some of the old articles on the streethunters.net website. And I hit a goldmine. Both Andrew and Spyros have picked the 10 reasons why they love street photography, but since I’ve joined the team I haven’t got round to it. And what better way to rekindle my passion and get myself back in the groove than remind myself why street photography is so awesome in the first place? So, strap in for the 10 reasons why I love street photography!

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Leon Levinstein book review cover

It’s very hard to imagine a street photographer today working in relative anonymity. Social media sites have become our galleries, providing easy accessibility and near-constant availability. There is natural compulsion to share, and not just for the sake of recognition. Sharing is used to network and to garner critique and feedback. Few street photographers make a living solely practicing their craft, but there are rewards to reap through sharing. One can make a name for themselves, which can be satisfying enough. Street photographers can also win money and gear through online entry into contests held by websites, physical galleries and other organizations. But at the end of the day, we want our work to be seen. We may say how much likes and little hearts and stars don’t matter, but we still want others to view our images. Getting eyes on our work is just a post and a few hashtags away.

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Street Hunters Local Guides Updated

Introduction

Approximately one month ago Digby Fullam announced the Streethunters Local Guide idea that Gaël Berthon shared with us. You can read all about it if you visit his blog post “Streethunters Local Guide: Become a Guide or Fixer for Street Photographers Visiting your City”. In a nutshell what is says is that if you want to volunteer to show another street photographer around your city, you can just share your info with Streethunters.net and be added to the list of Streethunters Local Guides.

Already many of you have been emailing us, asking for connections in various cities. As mentioned in the previous post by Digby, to make things faster and easier for you, we said we would make a list of names that you can easily browse through.

So today we are presenting you with the very first version of the Streethunters Local Guides list. We are pretty sure that new names will be added here as more and more people find out about it. It is a very helpful list that will prove useful to all you traveling Street Hunters!

One more thing. You might find that some names are in more than one cities. That is because some of you have volunteered for more than one location.

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Using a 35mm Lens for Street Photography Cover

Introduction

We all like to chop and change our lens selections from time to time. One of the things I have discovered as I have practiced street photography more and more is that a prime lens is perfect for street photography. There are several reasons for this, but that’s a story for another time. But once you’ve decided that you prefer prime lenses over zoom lenses for street photography a problem presents itself. Which focal length should you choose? After all, you can’t simply switch focal lengths as you would with a zoom lens. You may remember a while back I wrote about my experiences using a 50mm lens for street photography. I’ve also talked about why I currently feel that the 28mm is the perfect street photography lens. This time round I’ve decided to focus on the photojournalist’s holy grail – the 35mm lens. So read on for my pros and cons of using a 35mm lens for street photography!